A surviving person who unlawfully and intentionally kills or participates in procuring the death of the decedent is not entitled to any benefits under the Will or under the Florida Probate Code, and the estate of the decedent passes as if the killer had predeceased the decedent. Property appointed by the Will of the decedent to or for the benefit of the killer passes as if the killer had predeceased the decedent.

Any joint tenant who unlawfully and intentionally kills another joint tenant thereby effects a severance of the interest of the decedent so that the share of the decedent passes as the decedent’s property and the killer has no rights by survivorship. This provision applies to joint tenancies with right of survivorship and tenancies by the entirety in real and personal property; joint and multiple-party accounts in banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, and other institutions; and any other form of coownership with survivorship incidents.

A named beneficiary of a bond, life insurance policy, or other contractual arrangement who unlawfully and intentionally kills the principal obligee or the person upon whose life the policy is issued is not entitled to any benefit under the bond, policy, or other contractual arrangement; and it becomes payable as though the killer had predeceased the decedent.

A final judgment of conviction of murder in any degree is conclusive for purposes in Probate estates. In the absence of a conviction of murder in any degree, the Probate Court may determine by the greater weight of the evidence whether the killing was unlawful and intentional for purposes of this section.

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